Boats

Rhyme Cube:  Click here for description.

Sign Language:  Word of the day was “Boat

Opening Rhyme:

“Open them, shut them,
Give a little clap!
Open them, shut them,
Now put them in your lap!”

First Book:  App – Boats by Byron Barton (Oceanhouse Media)

So I finally have the equipment to do digital storytelling!  Thanks to a generous donation from our Friends group we were able to purchase a 70 inch flat screen TV and an Apple TV.  The Apple TV lets me wirelessly mirror whatever is on my iPad to the TV.  I had a few issues getting everything set up.  Even though we have a staff-only wifi network, it was too congested and apps ran slowly/stuttered when I mirrored them.  I decided to use my iphone as a hotspot and connected both the Apple TV and the iPad to that.  It was an easy fix!

Boat ST1

Byron Barton’s book apps developed by Oceanhouse Media are awesome so I used this as an opportunity to recommend them to the grown-ups in the room.  Today was a great day to use the Apple TV because I had about 60 people at storytime.  Mirroring it to the TV made what would have been a 10 inch by 8 inch book into a 4 foot by 3 foot book!

Felt Board:  “This Little Boat Went…”

I got the idea for this felt board (and the clip art!) from Sunflower Storytime.

“The first little boat went chug, chug, chug.
The second little boat went tug, tug, tug.
The third little boat went row, row, row.
The fourth little boat went oh sooo slooooow.
Here comes the sailboat, watch it go!”

Boat ST clipart

Song:  “I’m Sitting in a Boat”

I learned this song from Jbrary‘s Youtube channel.  Since it isn’t a well known song, I put the lyrics up on the screen (using the iPad and a presentation app called Keynote) and asked the grown-ups to sing along with me.  Here’s what it looked like on the screen:Boat ST song

“I’m sitting in a boat and the boat is rocking, rocking, rocking.
I’m sitting in a boat and the boat is rocking, rocking, rocking.
I’m sitting in a boat and the waves are oh so high, oh so high
In the morning, oh oh oh!”

Credit:  This song was written and recorded by Debbie Carroll for her album “Up and Over the Moon:  Giggle, Dance and Cuddle Songs for the Very Young”.  You can purchase the CD from her website DebbieCarroll.com

Second Book:  Little Tug by Stephen Savage

Digital Pictures:  Anchors and Oil Tankers

Next I planned on doing a felt board activity with the kids involving an anchor and some oil tankers.  Those are pretty big words so I thought I’d use the iPad to show some images and expand their vocabularies and background knowledge!  I used the Keynote app for this too.  First I showed a picture of an anchor and briefly explained how they work.Boat ST anchor

Next I showed the kids a picture of an oil tanker and explained that they are huge ships!  Since they are so big they need really big anchors – around 10 feet tall, and they usually have more than one anchor for a ship that big! [this fact is courtesy of my dad who used to be a captain on cargo ships – thanks dad 🙂 ]

Boat ST oil

For the felt activity I cut out the outline of an oil tanker in four different colors.  I also cut out a cute little anchor.  I told the kids to close their eyes as I hid the anchor behind one of the oil tankers.  I asked them to guess where it was hidden and we recited this rhyme:

“Little anchor, little anchor
Are you underneath the blue oil tanker?”

I then lifted up the blue oil tanker to reveal if the anchor was there or not.  We played this a few times. Here’s the felt board:

Boat ST anchor felt

Third Book:  Sheep on a Ship by Nancy Shaw

Felt Board:  Sailboat Colors

I got this idea from Storytime Katie.

“Riding around in my little red boat,
Riding around in my little red boat,
Riding around in my little red boat,
Zoom, zoom, zoom, zoom, Splash!”  (tune of 10 Little Indians)

I put up a different color sailboat for each verse.  We have a sailboat shaped die-cut so making the sailboats was super easy.

.Boat ST sailboats

Ukulele Song:

We sang “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” as I played the melody on the ukulele.  I included some silly verses too:

“Row row row your boat, gently down the stream
Merrily merrily merrily merrily life is but a dream.
Row row row your boat gently down the stream,
If you see a crocodile, don’t forget to scream! AHH!!!!
Row row row your boat, gently to the shore,
If you see a lion there, don’t forget to ROAR!!!”

(credit: Sunflower Storytime)

Goodbye Song:

Tickle the clouds
Tickle your toes
Turn around
Tickle your nose
Reach down low
Reach up high
Storytime is over
So wave goodbye!

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A Horse of Course!

This week we read stories about horses!

Rhyme Cube:  Click here for description.

Sign Language:  Word of the day was “Horse

Opening Song:

“Open them, shut them,
Give a little clap!
Open them, shut them,
Now put them in your lap!”

First Book: Horses: Trotting! Prancing! Racing! by Patricia HubbellHorses: Trotting! Prancing! Racing!

Felt Board:  I Gave My Horse an Apple

horse apple

I gave my horse an apple, (pretend to give something)
And she gave me a neigh. (neigh)
I gave my horse a carrot, (pretend to give something)
And she moved her head this way. (move head up and down)
I gave my horse a sugar lump, (pretend to give something)
She gave me a smile. (smile big)
And then she took me for a ride,
For more than half a mile. (slap hands on thighs like galloping)

(credit: Storytime in a Box)

Fingerplay: 10 Galloping Horses

Ten galloping horses, (hold up ten fingers)
Came through town. (slap hands on legs like galloping)
Five were white, (hold up five fingers)
And five were brown. (hold up five fingers on other hand)
They galloped up, (slap up toward top of thighs)
They galloped down, (slap down toward knees)
Ten galloping horses, (hold up ten fingers)
Came through town. (slap hands on legs like galloping)

(credit: King County Library System)

Second Book:  Are You a Horse? by Andy RashAre You A Horse?

Activity:  Giddy-Up!

I had all the kids stand up and pretend to hold onto reins.  I told them to gallop as we sang (to the tune of the William Tell Overture):

“Giddy-up, giddy-up, giddy-up-up-up!
Giddy-up, giddy-up, giddy-up-up-up!
Giddy-up, giddy-up, giddy-up-up-up!
WHOA, Horsie! ”  (we leaned back and paused on this part)

We sang the song a few times, getting faster and faster!

(credit: The Loudest Librarian)

Felt Board:  Colored Horses

horses color

I got this idea from Storytime Katie.  I laminated different colored horses, put a little velcro on the back, and gave one to each child.  I told them to wait until I called their color horse and then they could come up and put it on the board.  This is so hard for them!  It’s too exciting to wait! We did a similar activity last week with shells and this time they did honestly get a little better at waiting for their turn.  One little trick I do when a kid comes up with the wrong color is to say “Oh how cool! But your horse is yellow not blue.  Can you go show it to your grown-up until I call the yellow horses up?” This works some of the time!

Here’s the rhyme I came up with:

“If your horse is the color blue,
Gallop it on your shoe!
If you have a blue horse,
Come put it in the barn, of course!”

(yellow –  gallop it on your elbow
green – gallop it on your knee
purple – gallop it in a circle
red – gallop it on your head)

Third Book:  Clip-Clop by Nicola SmeeClip-Clop

Ukulele:  She’ll Be Coming Round the Mountain

horse uke

I printed out some clip art to go with each verse of the song and put it up on the wall before we sang.  We also counted the horses to make sure there were six!  The verses we sang were:

She’ll be coming round the mountain,…
She’ll be driving six white horses,…
She’ll be wearing pink pajamas,…
We’ll all come out and greet her,….

The chords I used can be found here.

I have no natural music ability and I make lots of mistakes but the kids seem to still enjoy it.  Jason Poole, a good friend and children’s librarian (who also happens to be a wonderful musician) told me that it’s good for kids to see you make mistakes.  It lets them know that adults aren’t perfect either and the important thing is to not give up!

Goodbye Song:

“Let’s tickle the clouds,
And tickle our toes,
And turn around,
And tickle our nose,
Reach down low,
Reach up high,
Storytime is over,
So wave goodbye!”

Another Baby Storytime – Rhythm Sticks

It’s about time I include another baby storytime on this blog.  So here it is…

Welcome:  Hello everyone!  I’m so happy to see you all today.  (model the sign for “happy“)  We’ll do every rhyme twice and clap for ourselves and each other a lot!

Sign Language:  Word of the day is “bath“.  You can do this sign before, during, and after bath time.

Rhymes:  The following few rhymes I do every week at baby storytime because repetition is good!

1.
Everybody wave hello, wave hello, wave hello.
Everybody wave hello, let’s have some fun.
Everybody wave hello, wave hello, wave hello.
Everybody wave hello, now our song is done. (model sign for “done“.  This is a useful sign for babies because you can use it at the end of meals, playtime, bath time,…)

2.
Old Mother Goose when she wanted to wander    (tap thighs to rhythm)
Would fly through the air on her very fine gander  (lift child into the air)

3.
Two little dickey birds sitting on a cloud  (hold both pointer fingers up in front of you)
One named “Soft”                                 (wiggle right pointer while you whisper)
The other named “Loud.”                      (wiggle left pointer while you “shout”)
Fly away Soft!                                       (move right pointer behind back and whisper)
Fly away Loud!                                      (move left pointer behind back and “shout”)
Come back Soft!                                   (bring right point to front and whisper)
Come back Loud!                                  (bring left point to front and “shout”)

“That last rhyme was about a bird.  Can you say ‘bird‘ in sign language?”

Book:  What Does Baby Say? by Begin Smart

This book is great because you can do a number of corresponding signs as you read.  I model the sign language words for:  more, drink, cat, mommy, eat.

Rhymes:  The following rhymes change from week-to-week.

4.
Here we go up, up, up.                        (lift child up)
Here we go down, down, down.          (bring child back to lap)
Here we go backwards and forward.  (hold child close and lean back)
Here we go round and round.              (hold child close and move in a circle)

5.
Pizza, pickle, pumpernickel,     (trace a circle on child’s tummy)
My little honey’s going to get a tickle!  (tickle child)
One for your nose,         (point to corresponding body parts)
One for your toes,
And one for your belly
Where the hot dog goes!

6.
Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes
Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes
Eyes and ears and mouth and nose
Head, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes

Felt Board:  Humpty Dumpty

I placed the felt pieces on the board as I recited the rhyme.  We did this felt board twice.humpty1

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall
All the kings horses and all the kings men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again

humpty2humpty3

I found the pattern for this felt board at KizClub

Rhymes:

7.
Tick tock, tick tock, I’m a little cuckoo clock    (hold child close and rock side to side)
Tick tock, tick tock, Now I’m striking one o’clock
Cuckoo!            (lift child into the air)

Tick tock, tick tock, I’m a little cuckoo clock
Tick tock, tick tock, Now I’m striking two o’clock
Cuckoo!   Cuckoo!      (lift child into the air twice)

Tick tock, tick tock, I’m a little cuckoo clock
Tick tock, tick tock, Now I’m striking three o’clock
Cuckoo!   Cuckoo!   Cuckoo!    (lift child into the air three times)

(the tick tock rhyme is a favorite with my current group)

8.
This is my right hand,
I’ll raise it up high.            (right hand up)
This is my left hand,
I’ll touch the sky.              (left hand up)
Right hand,                      (show right palm)
Left hand                         (show left palm)
Roll them around            (roll hands)
Right hand,                     (show palm)
Left hand                        (show palm)
Pound, pound, pound!   (pound fists together)

This is my right foot,     (hold up child’s right foot)
I tap it on the ground.    (tap the ground)
This is my left foot,       (hold up child’s left foot)
I kick it all around.         (kick it around)
Right foot,                     (hold right foot)
Left foot,                        (hold left foot)
Give ‘em both a kick.    (kick feet)
Left foot,                        (hold left foot)
Right foot,                      (hold right foot)
Click, click, click!           (click heels together)

9.
We’re flying to the moon.      (bounce child on yoru lap)
We’re flying to the moon.
Oh, what an adventure! We’re flying to the moon.
10 – 9 – 8 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1 – BLAST OFF!  (lift child into the air)

Activity:  Rhythm Sticks

rhythm sticks

Next I pass out two rhythm sticks to each child/caregiver.  If the kids are older they can hold the sticks themselves.  The caregiver can hold the sticks hand over hand for the really little babies.

I told the parents that I expect the children to explore making sounds with the sticks, that’s the whole point after all!  As long as no one is hurting themselves or others with the sticks we’re all good!

Here are the rhymes we did with the sticks:

10.
This is the way we tap our sticks, tap our sticks,
tap our sticks.
This is the way we tap our sticks so early in the
morning!

This is the way we rub our sticks, rub our sticks,
rub our sticks.
This is the way we rub our sticks so early in the
morning!

This is the way we tap the floor, tap the floor,
tap the floor.
This is the way we tap the floor so early in the
morning!

11.
Tap your sticks in the air with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks on the floor with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks in the air with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks on the floor with a 1-2-3

Tap your sticks to the left with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks to the right with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks to the left with a 1-2-3
Tap your sticks to the right with a 1-2-3

(I got this rhyme from Hap Palmer’s Rhythms on Parade CD.  Check out this YouTube clip)

12.
There was a farmer had a dog and Bingo was
his name-o!
B-I-N-G-O, B-I-N-G-O, B-I-N-G-O
and Bingo was his name-o!

(we tapped our sticks for the B-I-N-G-O part)

Early Literacy Tip:  When you sing or play music with your child, the rhythm allows them to hear syllables and break words into “chunks”.  This skill will help them later when learning to read.

I was really worried that using the rhythm sticks was going to be a huge disaster but it wasn’t!  The little ones had a blast.  A mom came in the next week and said her daughter was using crayons as rhythm sticks at home!  So cute.

Playtime:  I got out a bunch of toys and put on music and we all played.  “Play

Goodbye Song:

13.
Our hands say thank you with A clap, clap, clap
Our feet say thank you with a
Tap, tap, tap.
Clap, clap, clap!
Tap, tap, tap!
We roll our hands around, and say,
“Good-bye.”

Eggs!

I did an egg themed storytime around Easter.  I try not to do anything religious themed so “eggs” are perfect for this time of year

Rhyme Cube: Click here for description

Sign Language:  “Egg

Opening Rhyme:  Open them, shut them…

First BookEggs 1 2 3: Who Will the Babies Be? by Janet Halfmann

Rhyme:

“Oh, I wish I were a teeny tiny egg.
Oh, I wish I were a teeny tiny egg.
I would roll and roll around,
Rolling all around the ground.
Oh, I wish I were a teeny tiny egg.”

(from Preschool Express)

Felt Board: Where is Little Baby Chick?

I totally stole this awesome felt board idea from the Read it Again! blog.  The kids loved it!  I cut out ten different colored eggs from felt and then found clip art images of ten different items (including a little yellow baby chick).  I laminated the clip art items and put a little velcro dot on the back of each one so it wouldn’t fall off the board.eggs2

I placed the ten images on the board and put the felt eggs over each one.  I showed the kids my board and told them we need to find the little yellow baby chick.

I asked them which color egg I should check under first.  They shouted out some colors.  I went with one of their suggestions but tried to save the little baby chick for last.  If they told me to check under the green egg I said “little baby chick are you under the green egg?”  Then I lifted the egg up to reveal what was hiding underneath.  I asked the kids to tell me what it was and then asked them a question or two about the item.  For example if it was the cat I said “what color is that cat?” and “what does a cat say?”.eggs

We continued on until we found the little baby yellow chick! (and the angry bird! – this was such a fun idea that I also stole from the Read it Again! blog).

angry bird

Second Book: Except If by Jim AverbeckExcept If

Rhyme:

I’m a Little Chickie
(To the Tune of: I’m a Little Teapot)

I’m a little chickie,                   (crouch down inside your egg)
Ready to hatch,
Pecking at my shell,              (Pecking motion)
Scratch, scratch, scratch!    (scratching motion)
When I crack it open,
Out I’ll jump                           (jump out of shell)
Fluff my feathers,
Cheep! Cheep! Cheep!

(from Everything Preschool)

Felt Board:  Three Eggs in a Basket

egg basket

I got this felt board idea from the Storytiming blog.  I had three eggs in a basket and underneath the eggs I had a turtle, a chick, and a duck.  I pointed out the differences between the eggs (size and shape) and told the kids that “one day, the first egg began to shake!  Then it started to crack!  And out popped a…… TURTLE!”  I continued until we had all the eggs removed.

eggs turtle

Then I said the mama turtle came, the mama hen came, and the mama duck came.  I put all the mama’s on the board.  Next I put all the babies on the mama’s backs and said “Off they went on their mama’s backs to go play.”

Third Book:  Ollie by Olivier DunreaOllie

Activity:  Egg Shakers

Next we each got an egg shaker and shook our sillies out while we listened to Laurie Berkner’s “I Know a Chicken” song on the Whaddaya Think of That? CD.Thanks to Miss Sarah’s Storytime for this activity idea.

Blankets

I should have made this a BYOB storytime (Bring Your Own Blanket) but forgot to tell the parents ahead of time.  Darn!

Rhyme Cube:  Click here for description

Sign Language:  “Blanket”  – we repeated this word often.

Opening Rhyme:  Open them, shut them…

First Book:  Flora’s Blanket by Debi Gliori

Rhyme: Fuzzy Blanket

I have a fuzzy blanket
To snuggle in at night
I wrap it all around me
And pull it warm and tight!

Rhyme from Sunflower Storytime

Felt Board:  I Once Had a Blanket

I once had a blanket.
It was fluffy and new.
I once had a blanket,
And its color was __________ (blue).
I once had a blanket,
The prettiest I’ve seen.
I once had a blanket,
And its color was ________ (green).
I once had a blanket,
Soft as a pillow.
I once had a blanket,
And its color was _______ (yellow).
I once had a blanket,
At the foot of my bed.
I once had a blanket,
And its color was ________ (red).

Rhyme from Jen in the Library

Here’s a picture of the blankets I made (just a rectangle of felt with satin ribbon glued on the edges):

blankets

Close up:

blanketclose

Felt Board:

While I had the blankets up on the board we also played “Teddy bear, teddy bear, are you under there?”   I turned the board so the kids couldn’t see and hid a felt teddy bear under one of the blankets.  Then turned the board to show the kids and asked them to guess under which blanket teddy was hiding.  We chanted “teddy bear, teddy bear, are you under there?” while I pointed to the blanket we were going to look under.  The kids always love this game.

blanketbear

Second Book:  Small Bunny’s Blue Blanket by Tatyana Feeney

Felt Board:  Princess Marigold’s Blanket

I stole this awesome flannel board from Miss Mary Liberry.

Here’s the story that goes with it (I altered it a little to fit my felt board pieces) –

“The king and queen have a beautiful baby girl, whom they name Princess Marigold. They decide she must have a blanket as beautiful as she is. The king looks out the window at the sky and declares, “she must have a blanket as yellow as the sun in the sky.”  The queen also looks out and sees the bright clouds, and declares, “the blanket must be as white as the fluffy clouds floating by.” This continues…
As orange as the flowers in my garden, as green as the grass, as red as the apples in the trees,  as purple as the grapes on the vine, as brown as the earth from which they grow, and finally as pink as our baby’s cheeks.

The servants look everywhere for just such a blanket but can’t find one. They bring in tailors and weavers from all over the kingdom and each can create a blanket with one of the colors, but not all. Finally, an old woman comes forward and offers her faded quilt that she wrapped her children in as babies. She made it from scraps of yarn, blankets, a dress, apron, curtains, and ribbons.
The King and Queen state that they are honored to have it, as it is “as beautiful as our daughter but also as warm as a mother’s embrace and as light as a father’s kiss.” They wrap Princess Marigold in the blanket and they all live happily ever after.”

Here’s a picture with all the pieces on the board:marigoldfelt

Here’s a picture of the king and queen puppets (just like Miss Mary Liberry, I got these as a freebie from Muzzy):

kingqueen (i just placed them on the table as I told the story because I’m not coordinated enough to handle all the puppets and felt pieces at once)

Here’s the baby, Princess Marigold:

baby (this baby finger puppet came in a pack or finger puppets I got from IKEA)

Rhyme:  A is for Alligator  (not related to blankets but we need to get our wiggles out)

A is for Alligator  (make an “A” in sign language)
Chomp, Chomp, Chomp!  (make a chomping motion with your arms)

B is for Bouncy Ball  (Make a “B” in sign language)
Bounce, Bounce, Bounce!  (jump up and down)

C is for Circle  (make a “C” in sign language)
Spin around!  (spin in a circle)

D is for Dizzy (make a “D” in sign language)
Sit back down!  (point down to the ground and then sit)

Third Book:  Fly Blanky Fly by Anne Margaret Lewis

Song: (to the tune of the “Oscar Mayer Weiner” song)

“Oh I wish I was a fuzzy wuzzy blanket
That is what I’d truly like to be
Cause If I was a fuzzy wuzzy blanket
Everyone would snuggle up with me!”

(From the Perry Public Library)

Activity: Give the kids scarves (mini blankets!) and do the corresponding actions along with the following rhyme-

At breakfast time, oh me, oh my
Milk spilled on my blanket – oh me, oh my
Have to wash my blanket
And lay it out to dry

At lunch time, oh me, oh my
Peanut butter spilled on my blanket – oh me, oh my
Have to wash my blanket
And lay it out to dry

At snack time, oh me, oh my
Mustard spilled on my blanket – oh me, oh my
Have to wash my blanket
And lay it out to dry

At dinner time, oh me, oh my
Spaghetti spilled on my blanket – oh me, oh my
Have to wash my blanket
And lay it out to dry

At bedtime, oh me, oh my
Cookie crumbs fell on my blanket – oh me, oh my
Have to shake my blanket out
No time to wash or dry (shake head no)
I need my blanket (hug blanket)
It’s time for beddy bye (pretend to sleep)

(this idea came from the Storytime Source Page)

Wheels on the Bus!

Another storytime I’ve done recently was based on buses!

Rhyme Cube:  (Click here for description)

Sign Language: word of the day is “bus”

There are often multiple ways of saying a word in sign language so I usually try to teach the kids the easiest sign.

I have the kids repeat the word after each book we read.

Opening Rhyme:  Open them, shut them…

First Book:  Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort

I have the kids do corresponding motions as I read this story.  For example, when the geese on the bus go “honk, honk, honk”  I have the kids make quaking motion with their hands.

Flannel Board:

“5 yellow buses,

Around the town they zoom.

1 makes a stop and the others go vroom.

How many yellow buses are there?”

…continue until all the buses are gone!

bus

My director (who used to be a children’s librarian) gave me the best tip!  You can use the die cut machine to cut through flannel!!!  I don’t know why I hadn’t ever thought of this.  We have a bus die cut so I used it to make this flannel board.   It saves so much time and the flannel pieces look so nice!

Second Book:  Don’t Squish the Sasquatch! by Kent Redeker

Don't Squish the Sasquatch!

This book is ridiculous and funny so the kids really love it.  They catch on quick and shout along with the “Don’t Squish the Sasquatch!” refrain.  When all the characters each give the sasquatch a smooch, I have all the kids blow a big smooch into the air.

Rhyme: (tap your lap along to the beat of the rhyme)

A hip, a hip, a hippopotamus,

Got on, got on, got on a city bus,

And all, and all, and all the people said…

You’re squishing me! (squish cheeks in with your hands)

Third Book:  Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems

Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

The kids looove shouting “NO!” to the pigeon every time he asks to drive.  I make sure to tell them at the beginning of the story that no matter what the pigeon says they can not let him drive the bus!

iPad App: Wheels on the Bus by Duck Duck Moose

small icon wob Wheels on the Bus

To learn more about my philosophy for using apps in storytime click here.

This was a fun app to use during storytime.  It basically goes through each verse of the song with corresponding animations.  I hold the iPad facing the children and then activate the animations as we sing.  The app also lets you record your own voice and then listen to it as you go through the song again.  I recorded the kids singing a few verses and then played the app again so they could hear themselves.  According to Every Child Ready to Read singing is an important early literacy skill!

 Wheels on the Bus